Programs

    At the Tazewell Soil and Water Conservation District office, we utilize several government funded programs which can help local farmers increase the effectiveness of their farms without large financial burdens. Simply click on program names in order to find out more information on the programs with which we work.

Programs:

State Programs:

    TMDL - Total Maximum Daily Load

    BMP - Best Management Practices

   No Till Seeder- Available for Lease from TSWCD

Federal Programs:

    WHIP - Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program

    EQIP - Environmental Quality Incentive Program

    CREP - Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program

TMDL - Total Maximum Daily Load

Introduction:

Total maximum daily load program works with farmers to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution from agricultural practices that enter into our natural water systems.

Program Description:

For more information about this program, please stop by the Tazewell Soil and Water Conservation District office behind the BB&T Bank on Dial Rock Rd. Ask for Terisa Corell.

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BMP - Best Management Practices

Introduction:

Best Management Practices are designed to improve water quality by reducing the amount of sediment entering a stream.

Program Description:

For more information about this program, please stop by the Tazewell Soil and Water Conservation District office behind the BB&T Bank on Dial Rock Rd. Ask for Lenden Thompson.

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WHIP - Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program

Introduction

The Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP) is a voluntary program for conservation-minded landowners who want to develop and improve wildlife habitat on agricultural land, nonindustrial private forest land, and Indian land.

Program Description

The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 reauthorized WHIP as a voluntary approach to improving wildlife habitat in our Nation. The Natural Resources Conservation Service administers WHIP to provide both technical assistance and up to 75 percent cost-share assistance to establish and improve fish and wildlife habitat. WHIP cost-share agreements between NRCS and the participant generally last from one year after the last conservation practice is implemented but not more than 10 years from the date the agreement is signed.

WHIP Priorities for Fiscal Year 2009

In order to provide direction to the State and local levels for implementing WHIP to achieve its objective, NRCS has established the following national priorities:
  • Promote the restoration of declining or important native fish and wildlife habitats.
  • Protect, restore, develop or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species
  • Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish and wildlife habitats; and
  • Protect, restore, develop or enhance declining or important aquatic wildlife speciesí habitats

For more information please visit the NRCS website at the link below:

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/whip/ 

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EQIP - Environmental Quality Incentive Program

Introduction

The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) was reauthorized in the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (Farm Bill) to provide a voluntary conservation program for farmers and ranchers that promotes agricultural production and environmental quality as compatible national goals. EQIP offers financial and technical help to assist eligible participants install or implement structural and management practices on eligible agricultural land.

Program Description

EQIP offers contracts with a minimum term that ends one year after the implementation of the last scheduled practices and a maximum term of ten years. These contracts provide financial assistance to implement conservation practices. Owners of land in agricultural production or persons who are engaged in livestock or agricultural production on eligible land may participate in the EQIP program. Program practices and activities are carried out according to an EQIP program plan of operations developed in conjunction with the producer that identifies the appropriate conservation practice or measures needed to address the resource concerns. The practices are subject to NRCS technical standards adapted for local conditions.

EQIP provides payments up to 75 percent of the incurred costs and income foregone of certain conservation practices and activities. However certain historically underserved producers (Limited resource farmers/ranchers, beginning farmers/ranchers, socially disadvantaged producers) may be eligible for payments up to 90 percent of the estimated incurred costs and income foregone. Farmers and ranchers may elect to use a certified Technical Service Provider (TSP) for technical assistance needed for certain eligible activities and services. The new Farm Bill established a new payment limitation for individuals or legal entity participants who may not receive, directly or indirectly, payments that, in the aggregate, exceed $300,000 for all program contracts entered during any six year period. Projects determined as having special environmental significance may, with approval of the NRCS Chief, have the payment limitation raised to a maximum of $450,000.

For more information please visit the NRCS website at the link below:

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/eqip/

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CREP - Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program

Purpose:

CREP protects environmentally sensitive areas and improves water quality by restoring degraded wetlands and establishing vegetative buffers along streams and other eligible water bodies.

Eligibility:

CREP contracts of 10 or 15 years are available in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and in certain watersheds in the Southern Rivers region. Eligible lands include pasture and cropland adjacent to streams, intermittent streams, seeps, springs and ponds. Trees or a shrub/grass mix may be used to plant grass buffers. Livestock must be excluded from the buffers.

For more information please visit the USDA website at the link below:

http://www.va.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/#onservation Reserve Enhancement Program - CREP

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